Acne conglobata

Acne conglobata


Acne Conglobata definitionSevere form of acne found particularly in males, with comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, cysts, and multichanneled draining sinuses. Scarring and keloid formation are frequent sequelae. Lesions usually occur on the face, neck, trunk and upper extremities. synonymsAcne Conglobata UMLSAcne conglobata, Acne, conglobata images 20 images found for this diagnose

Inflammatory nodules may form around multiple comedones and grow until they break down and discharge pus. Deep ulcers may form under the nodules, producing keloid-type scars, and crusts may form over deeply ulcerated nodules. Abscesses can form deep, irregular scars. Acne conglobata may be preceded by acne cysts, papules or pustules that do not heal but instead rapidly deteriorate. Occasionally, it flares up in acne that had been dormant for many years. Rarely, acne conglobata can be associated with pyogenic arthritis and pyoderma gangrenosum (known as PAPA). This is thought to be a genetic condition (a defect of chromosome 15). Another variant is pyoderma gangrenosum, acne and suppurative hidradenitis (PASH) syndrome.

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definitionSevere form of acne found particularly in males, with comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, cysts, and multichanneled draining sinuses. Scarring and keloid formation are frequent sequelae. Lesions usually occur on the face, neck, trunk and upper extremities. synonymsAcne Conglobata UMLSAcne conglobata, Acne, conglobata images 20 images found for this diagnose

Acne conglobata is one of the most severe forms of acne. It involves many inflamed nodules that are connected under the skin to other nodules. It can affect the neck, chest, arms, and buttocks. It often leaves scars. This type of acne is more common in men and is sometimes caused by taking steroids or testosterone. Timely treatment by a dermatologist is essential.

acne conglobata [Lưu trữ] - Cồ Việt - Tri thức không giới hạn

Acne ConglobataAcne conglobata is one of the most severe forms of acne. It involves many inflamed nodules that are connected under the skin to other nodules. It can affect the neck, chest, arms, and buttocks. It often leaves scars. This type of acne is more common in men and is sometimes caused by taking steroids or testosterone. Timely treatment by a dermatologist is essential.

Acné Conglobata - Dermas, Skin, Piel Información

Acne fulminans is an uncommon, immune systemic disease in which the triggering antigen is thought to be P. acnes. Acne fulminans predominantly affects young males with a history of acne. High levels of testosterone (eg during therapy for Marfan's syndrome) and anabolic steroids appear to be trigger factors. Isotretinoin is also a precipitant, possibly due to an increase in P. acnes antigens in the patient's immune system. Acne fulminans can be the only feature of late-onset congenital adrenal hyperplasia in males. Genetic factors may play a part and concordance in twins has been reported.

Systemic therapy refers to acne medication that is taken by mouth. Antibiotics like tetracycline, minocycline, doxycycline, or erythromycin may treat moderate to severe acne by targeting bacteria and reducing inflammation. Other systemic therapies include oral contraceptives, which can reduce acne in some women, spironolactone, an anti-androgen hormone pill, and isotretinoin (high-dose prescription vitamin A). Isotretinoin is used only in certain severe, cystic acne cases, or in cases where other treatments don't work. A course of isotretinoin treatment requires regular appointments with your dermatologist.

Systemic TherapySystemic therapy refers to acne medication that is taken by mouth. Antibiotics like tetracycline, minocycline, doxycycline, or erythromycin may treat moderate to severe acne by targeting bacteria and reducing inflammation. Other systemic therapies include oral contraceptives, which can reduce acne in some women, spironolactone, an anti-androgen hormone pill, and isotretinoin (high-dose prescription vitamin A). Isotretinoin is used only in certain severe, cystic acne cases, or in cases where other treatments don't work. A course of isotretinoin treatment requires regular appointments with your dermatologist.

This condition generally begins between the ages of 18 and 30. It usually persists for a very long time, and often until the patient is around 40 years old. Although it often occurs where there is already an active acne problem, it can also happen to people whose acne has subsided. Although the cause of this type of acne is unknown, it is associated with testosterone and thus appears mainly in men. It can be caused by anabolic steroid abuse and sometimes appears in men after stopping testosterone therapy. It can also happen to someone who has a tumour that is releasing large amounts of androgens, or to people in remission from autoimmune diseases, such as leukemia. In certain persons, the condition may be triggered by exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons or ingestion of halogens.

Acne vulgaris is the medical name for common acne -- the presence of blackheads, whiteheads, and other types of pimples on the skin. The most common spots for breakouts are the face, chest, shoulders, and back. Although mild acne may improve with over-the-counter treatments, more severe forms should be treated by a dermatologist.

If you have 20 to 100 whiteheads or blackheads, 15 to 50 inflamed bumps, or 30 to 125 total lesions, your acne is considered moderate. Dermatologists usually recommend prescription medication for moderate to severe acne. It may take several weeks to notice an improvement, and your acne may appear to get worse before it gets better.

Topical therapy is acne medication that is applied directly to the skin, like gels or creams. Over-the-counter topical products can often help mild acne. They may contain ingredients like benzoyl peroxide, resorcinol, salicylic acid, or sulfur. Prescription products such as antimicrobial or retinoid creams can treat mild to moderately severe acne. These can be prescribed alone or in combination with other ingredients.

Acne VulgarisAcne vulgaris is the medical name for common acne -- the presence of blackheads, whiteheads, and other types of pimples on the skin. The most common spots for breakouts are the face, chest, shoulders, and back. Although mild acne may improve with over-the-counter treatments, more severe forms should be treated by a dermatologist.

Moderate AcneIf you have 20 to 100 whiteheads or blackheads, 15 to 50 inflamed bumps, or 30 to 125 total lesions, your acne is considered moderate. Dermatologists usually recommend prescription medication for moderate to severe acne. It may take several weeks to notice an improvement, and your acne may appear to get worse before it gets better.

Topical TherapyTopical therapy is acne medication that is applied directly to the skin, like gels or creams. Over-the-counter topical products can often help mild acne. They may contain ingredients like benzoyl peroxide, resorcinol, salicylic acid, or sulfur. Prescription products such as antimicrobial or retinoid creams can treat mild to moderately severe acne. These can be prescribed alone or in combination with other ingredients.

Nodulocystic acne is a severe form of acne affecting the face, chest and back. It is characterised by multiple inflamed and uninflamed nodules and frequently, scars. It is more common in males.

A comedo, or basic acne lesion, is a hair follicle that has become clogged with oil and dead skin cells. Comedones (the plural of comedo) can develop into bumps called whiteheads and blackheads. Products that may trigger comedones are called "comedogenic." Makeup labeled "noncomedogenic" is less likely to clog pores and contribute to acne.

Acne falls into the "mild" category if you have fewer than 20 whiteheads or blackheads, fewer than 15 inflamed bumps, or fewer than 30 total lesions. Mild acne is usually treated with over-the-counter topical medicine. It may take up to eight weeks to see a significant improvement.

Acne mechanica is caused by heat, friction, and pressure against the skin, often the result of wearing sports gear such as a helmet or baseball cap. It is sometimes called "sports-induced acne" because it occurs frequently in athletes. Preventive measures include wearing an absorbent material under sports equipment and showering immediately after activity.

ComedonesA comedo, or basic acne lesion, is a hair follicle that has become clogged with oil and dead skin cells. Comedones (the plural of comedo) can develop into bumps called whiteheads and blackheads. Products that may trigger comedones are called "comedogenic." Makeup labeled "noncomedogenic" is less likely to clog pores and contribute to acne.

Acne MechanicaAcne mechanica is caused by heat, friction, and pressure against the skin, often the result of wearing sports gear such as a helmet or baseball cap. It is sometimes called "sports-induced acne" because it occurs frequently in athletes. Preventive measures include wearing an absorbent material under sports equipment and showering immediately after activity.

This condition presents with blackheads appearing around the face, neck, chest, upper arms and buttocks in groups of two or three. The pimples form around the blackheads. They are large and engorged with fluid, and may be sensitive to touch. They remain for a while and continue to grow and fill with pus until they finally rupture. After the lesion has drained, it fills up again. After they rupture, several nodules can fuse together to form larger shapes. The lesions remain for a long time. They form a scab in the centre but they continue to spread outwards. When the lesions do eventually heal, they leave scars that can be the usual type of acne scar (atrophic) or can be the raised bump normally left behind by a burn or a cut (keloidal).

The most common treatment is the acne medication isotretinoin. It may be combined with prednisone. Dapsone, which is normally used to treat leprosy, is a riskier medication but is sometimes prescribed in cases where the normal therapy is ineffectual. Antibiotics such as tetracycline or erythromycin may also be prescribed. An alternative option is to treat with carbon dioxide laser therapy, followed by topical tretinoin therapy.

The recommended treatment for nodulocystic acne is isotretinoin, which should be commenced early to prevent scarring. The treatment is required for at least five months, and further courses are sometimes necessary.

Severe form of acne found particularly in males, with comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, cysts, and multichanneled draining sinuses. Scarring and keloid formation are frequent sequelae. Lesions usually occur on the face, neck, trunk and upper extremities.

definitionSevere form of acne found particularly in males, with comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, cysts, and multichanneled draining sinuses. Scarring and keloid formation are frequent sequelae. Lesions usually occur on the face, neck, trunk and upper extremities.

Cysts are large, pus-filled lesions that look similar to boils. Like nodules, cysts can be painful and should be treated by a dermatologist. People who develop nodules and cysts are usually considered to have a more severe form of acne.

CystsCysts are large, pus-filled lesions that look similar to boils. Like nodules, cysts can be painful and should be treated by a dermatologist. People who develop nodules and cysts are usually considered to have a more severe form of acne.

Mild AcneAcne falls into the "mild" category if you have fewer than 20 whiteheads or blackheads, fewer than 15 inflamed bumps, or fewer than 30 total lesions. Mild acne is usually treated with over-the-counter topical medicine. It may take up to eight weeks to see a significant improvement.
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