Folliculitis

Folliculitis

What is folliculitis? 

Folliculitis is an inflammation of the hair follicles. Each hair on your body grows out of a tiny pouch called a follicle. You can have folliculitis on any part of your body that has hair. But it is most common on the beard area, arms, back, buttocks, and legs. What causes folliculitis? It may be caused by bacteria. It also can be caused by yeast or another type of fungus. You may get folliculitis if you have damaged hair follicles. Shaving or wearing clothes that rub the skin can irritate the follicles, which can lead to folliculitis. They also can become blocked or irritated by sweat, machine oils, or makeup. When the follicles are injured, they are more likely to become infected. You are more likely to get folliculitis if you: Use a hot tub, whirlpool, or swimming pool that is not properly treated with chlorine. Wear tight clothes. Use or work with substances that can irritate or block the follicles. Examples include makeup, cocoa butter, motor oil, tar, and creosote. Have an infected cut, scrape, or surgical wound. The bacteria or fungi can spread to nearby hair follicles. Have a disease such as diabetes or HIV that lowers your ability to fight infection. What are the symptoms? Folliculitis usually looks like red pimples with a hair in the center of each one. The pimples may have pus in them, and they may itch or burn. When the pimples break open, they may drain pus, blood, or both. "Hot tub folliculitis" most often appears about 72 hours after you've been in a hot tub or spa. Many small pimples appear on your stomach and sometimes on your arms and legs. You might have a mild fever and have an upset stomach. Most of the time, this kind of folliculitis goes away on its own in 7 to 10 days. How is folliculitis diagnosed? Your doctor will check your skin and ask about your health and activities. He or she may do tests to find out what is causing your folliculitis and to make sure you don't have a different problem, such as impetigo or heat rash. Testing a sample of the fluid in the pimples or a sample of tissue can help your doctor learn what is causing the infection.

Folliculitis Is Infection Of Hair Follicles - HairBoutique.com Blog

If you do carry staphylococci in the nose and you get recurrent folliculitis (or if you have chronic folliculitis), this is likely to be the reason behind it. Treatment is to destroy (eradicate) the staphylococci and prevent further folliculitis. This will usually involve three forms of treatment to be used at the same time. Firstly, a course of antibiotic tablets. Secondly, a course of an antibiotic nasal cream. Because the staphylococci may also be on other parts of the body, not just where the folliculitis is, it is also advisable to use an antiseptic skin wash or shower gel. Products containing chlorhexidine (for example, Hibiscrub® 4% solution or Hydrex® 4% surgical scrub) or Ster-Zac Bath Concentrate®) are suitable. You should also launder clothing, bed linens and towels on a hot wash. Finally, you will need to have repeat swabs to confirm that you are clear of the bacteria - three clear swabs over a three-week period will confirm the staphylococcal infection has been eradicated.

Folliculitis Pictures Of Fungus And Bacterial Infected Human Hair ...

Irritant folliculitis is also common on the lower legs of women (shaving rash). It is frequently very itchy. Treatment is by stopping hair removal, and not beginning again for about three months after the folliculitis has settled. To prevent reoccurring irritant folliculitis, use a gentle hair removal method, such as a lady's electric razor. Avoid soap and apply plenty of shaving gel, if using a blade shaver.

Gram-negative folliculitis. DermNet NZ

Folliculitis usually occurs at sites where hair follicles are damaged by friction or shaving, or where there is blockage of the follicle. Excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) due to overactivity of the sweat glands can be another cause. Sometimes, using a steroid cream on the face can trigger a bout of folliculitis. The most common site affected is the beard area of men. Other common sites for folliculitis are the arms, legs, armpits and buttocks.

General measures involve avoiding things that aggravate the condition. It is important to shave in the direction of hair growth. Sometimes it is worth taking a break from shaving for a few days, to let the folliculitis settle down by itself. Tight clothing over the affected area, particularly if it makes you sweat, will not help either. Keeping cool and keeping folliculitis exposed to the fresh air will also help. If you have folliculitis you should not share towels, flannels or razors.

Most cases or folliculitis are mild and do not need any treatment. It often clears without any treatment within 7-10 days. It may be helpful to use a moisturiser (emollient) which contains an antibacterial agent - for example, Dermol® cream or lotion or Emulsiderm®. This will improve the condition of the skin and soothe it. It may help the folliculitis to clear more quickly and reduce the risk of it becoming worse. You can use one of these emollients as a soap substitute until the folliculitis has cleared. Specific preparations for the bath or shower are available - for example, Dermol® 200 Shower Emollient, Dermol 600® Bath Emollient and Oilatum® Plus bath additive.

Recurrent folliculitis occurs when the infection keeps coming back, although it disappears with treatment. The gaps between episodes may get shorter and, eventually, chronic folliculitis is the result. In these cases, your GP may take a sample (swab) from the skin where the folliculitis is. This swab can show what germs (bacteria) are responsible for the infection. If the swab confirms S. aureus, it is a good idea to take some more swabs, usually from the nose, to see if you are a carrier of this bacterium.

Folliculitis is the infection of hair follicles. This can occur anywhere on the skin or scalp. Usually there is some itch, sometimes a little soreness. Folliculitis looks like acne pimples or non-healing, crusty sores.An acute eruption or one present for only a short time is usually due to Staph bacteria (impetigo of Bockhart). This is treated with oral cephalexin, dicloxacillin or similar oral antibiotic. Topical antibiotics creams or lotions can also be used. Bactroban ointment should be applied into the front of the nose for several days to prevent a carrier state. While this may seem like it makes no sense, the inside front area of the nostrils is often a place where bacteria can survive a course of oral antibiotics. Later, they spread back to the skin to cause a relapse.Chronic or recurring folliculitis is less likely to clear with just antibiotics. Often this is on the legs of women, but it can occur in any areas of shaving, waxing, hair plucking or friction. These need to be stopped for at least 3 months to allow the hair to grow in healthy. If shaving is resumed, one should shave with the grain of the hair; it won't FEEL quite as smooth, but it will LOOK a whole lot better.An antibiotic such as tetracycline or minocycline can be given for 4 to 6 weeks. Unless the skin is sensitive, drying, antiseptic lotions should be used on the affected areas such as Xerac-AC (aluminum chlorhydrate solution), Cleocin-T solution or Benzaclin gel. In some cases, the infection with unusual bacteria may be picked up from a dirty hot tub or scrubbing brush.For those with sensitive skin, friction and rubbing must be avoided. Avoid Lycra workout clothes, and tight fitting rough fabrics like blue jeans in the affected area. Apply a non-greasy moisturizer such as Lac-hydrin cream (ammonium lactate 12%) plus mild prescription cortisone cream to the area if there is an associated atopic dermatitis (eczema).Resistant and recurrent cases, especially on the legs may clear with hair removal laser treatments. This may be expensive and require several treatments, but is helpful when other treatments fail. Back to Index

Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged by friction from clothing, an insect bite, blockage of the follicle, shaving, or braids too tight and too close to the scalp. In most cases of folliculitis, the damaged follicles are then infected with the bacterium Staphylococcus. Folliculitis usually affects those in their early adult life, and may persist till their early 30s. Warmer weather may worsen the condition.

The most common yeast to cause a folliculitis is Pityrosporum ovale, also known as Malassezia. Malassezia folliculitis (Pityrosporum folliculitis) is an itchy acne-like condition usually affecting the upper trunk of a young adult. Treatment includes avoiding moisturisers, stopping any antibiotics and topical antifungal or oral antifungal medication for several weeks.

Folliculitis may arise as hairs regrow after shaving, waxing, electrolysis or plucking. Swabs taken from the pustules are sterile ie there is no growth of bacteria or other organisms. In the beard area irritant folliculitis is known as pseudofolliculitis barbae.

Folliculitis may be due to drugs, particularly corticosteroids (steroid acne), androgens (male hormones), ACTH, lithium, isoniazid (INH), phenytoin and B-complex vitamins. Protein kinase inhibitors (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors) and targeted therapy for metastatic melanoma (vemurafenib, dabrafenib) nearly always result in folliculitis.

Most cases of folliculitis are due to an infection with a germ (bacterium) called Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). This bacterium is carried harmlessly in the noses of many people, without causing any problems. Occasionally, other germs (bacteria) are the cause of folliculitis.

Folliculitis can occur anywhere on hair-bearing skin. (It could not, for example, occur on the palms of the hands where there is no hair.) There are a few specific types of folliculitis that deserve a mention:

Folliculitis is the infection of hair follicles. This can occur anywhere on the skin or scalp. Usually there is some itch, sometimes a little soreness. Folliculitis looks like acne pimples or non-healing, crusty sores.

Folliculitis is an inflammation of the hair follicles. Each hair on your body grows out of a tiny pouch called a follicle. You can have folliculitis on any part of your body that has hair. But it is most common on the beard area, arms, back, buttocks, and legs.

You may get folliculitis if you have damaged hair follicles. Shaving or wearing clothes that rub the skin can irritate the follicles, which can lead to folliculitis. They also can become blocked or irritated by sweat, machine oils, or makeup. When the follicles are injured, they are more likely to become infected.

Hot tub folliculitis (pseudomonas folliculitis). This type is caused by pseudomonas bacteria. You may be exposed to these bacteria in many places, including hot tubs and heated pools in which the chlorine and pH levels aren't well-regulated. You may develop a rash of red, round, itchy bumps one to four days after exposure. These may later develop into small pus-filled blisters (pustules).

Folliculitis may be superficial or deep. It can affect anywhere there are hairs, including chest, back, buttocks, arms and legs. Acne and its variants are also types of folliculitis.

Spa pool folliculitis is due to infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which thrives in inadequately chlorinated warm water. Gram negative folliculitis is a pustular facial eruption also due to infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa or other similar organisms. When it appears, it usually follows tetracycline treatment of acne, but is quite rare.

Paraffin-based ointments, moisturisers, and adhesive plasters may all result in a sterile folliculitis. If a moisturiser is needed, choose an oil-free product, as it is less likely to cause occlusion.

Folliculitis is an infection of the hair follicles in the skin. It is a common problem that is not usually serious. Tiny pus-filled spots (pustules) develop at the base of a hair, often in crops. Mild cases often resolve without treatment. Sometimes, antibiotic creams or tablets are needed. In recurrent cases, antiseptic skin washes can be used.

As mentioned above, these can cause a condition that looks like folliculitis. They are hairs that have curled around and grown back into the skin. Anyone can have ingrowing hairs (also called ingrown hairs), but they are more common in people who have very curly or coarse hair. Curly hair is more likely to bend back and re-enter the skin, especially after it's been shaved or cut. Ingrowing hairs may also be caused by dead skin cells blocking the hair growing as normal.

Usually, folliculitis is a mild, non-serious problem that does not lead to complications. In fact, often it is self-limiting which means that it gets better on its own, without treatment.

Uncommonly, infection in the hair follicle can spread deeper or to surrounding tissues, leading to boils (furuncles or carbuncles - see above). A generalised skin infection called cellulitis can occur. This can usually be treated with a course of antibiotic tablets. Occasionally, cellulitis can be more serious and spread. This may need antibiotics given directly into a vein in hospital but this would be very rare to have happened because of folliculitis.

Keeping your skin clean, dry and free from abrasions or irritations can help to prevent folliculitis. Certain people are more prone to infections, such as people with diabetes. If you have a medical problem that makes you more likely to get infections, these precautions may be more important. Using antiseptic washes routinely is not generally recommended, as they can make the skin sore and dry. Keeping the skin moisturised can help protect it from damage. Take care when shaving (especially if you wet shave), using a shaving gel, foam or soap to lubricate the blades across the skin and prevent nicks and cuts.

Chronic or recurring folliculitis is less likely to clear with just antibiotics. Often this is on the legs of women, but it can occur in any areas of shaving, waxing, hair plucking or friction. These need to be stopped for at least 3 months to allow the hair to grow in healthy. If shaving is resumed, one should shave with the grain of the hair; it won't FEEL quite as smooth, but it will LOOK a whole lot better.

Folliculitis is the infection and inflammation of one or more hair follicles. The condition may occur anywhere on the skin with the exception of the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. The rash may appear as red dots that come to white tips on the chest, back, arms, legs, and head.

If you have a mild case, it'll likely clear in a few days with basic self-care measures. For more serious or recurring folliculitis, you may need to see a doctor.

Folliculitis usually looks like red pimples with a hair in the center of each one. The pimples may have pus in them, and they may itch or burn. When the pimples break open, they may drain pus, blood, or both.

Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged or when the follicle is blocked. This may occur from rubbing against clothing or shaving, for example. Most of the time, the damaged follicles become infected with Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria.

Causes Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged or when the follicle is blocked. This may occur from rubbing against clothing or shaving, for example. Most of the time, the damaged follicles become infected with Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria.Barber's itch is a staph infection of the hair follicles in the beard area, usually the upper lip. Shaving makes it worse. Tinea barbae is similar to barber's itch, but the infection is caused by a fungus.Pseudofolliculitis barbae is a disorder that occurs mainly in black men. If curly beard hairs are cut too short, they may curve back into the skin and cause inflammation.

Folliculitis starts when hair follicles are damaged or when the follicle is blocked. This may occur from rubbing against clothing or shaving, for example. Most of the time, the damaged follicles become infected with Staphylococcus (staph) bacteria.Barber's itch is a staph infection of the hair follicles in the beard area, usually the upper lip. Shaving makes it worse. Tinea barbae is similar to barber's itch, but the infection is caused by a fungus.Pseudofolliculitis barbae is a disorder that occurs mainly in black men. If curly beard hairs are cut too short, they may curve back into the skin and cause inflammation.

Bacterial folliculitis is commonly due to Staphylococcus aureus. If the infection involves the deep part of the follicle, it results in a painful boil. Recommended treatment includes careful hygiene, antiseptic cleanser or cream, antibiotic ointment, and/or oral antibiotics.

Ringworm of the scalp (tinea capitis) usually results in scaling and hair loss, but sometimes results in folliculitis. In New Zealand, cat ringworm (Microsporum canis) is the commonest organism causing scalp fungal infection. Other fungi such as Trichophyton tonsurans are increasingly reported. Treatment is with oral antifungal agents for several months.
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